RA Mill Dean Blows His Brains Out
#1
Hey pal, try to keep that red mist and brain splatter off the Gold Standard, would ya?

RA Dickinson State U dean Doug LaPlante swallowed the business end of his rifle in a public park after it was discovered DSU was issuing degrees to hundreds of foreign students who hadn't earned them and couldn't even speak English.

Oh yeah, it must be the oil companies' fault. Rolleyes WTF?

Lax recordkeeping and oversight??? "Hey, who let all those jabbering Chinamen in here when I wasn't looking? Woopsy! Darn all these complicated records. Surely you don't think I planned this?"

Why didn't Bernie Madoff use that one? "I wasn't stealing, it was just lax recordkeeping and oversight. Sorry you all lost your money. May I go now?"

Quote:Audit: ND university awarded unearned degrees
by DALE WETZEL
The Associated Press

BISMARCK, N.D. — Facing pressure to bring in more students as North Dakota's booming oil industry made it tougher to coax new high school graduates into college, Dickinson State University began looking overseas to boost its enrollment.

China, which sends more students to U.S. universities than any other nation, became one of the school's more reliable suppliers of young people.

But as an audit made public Friday revealed, lax recordkeeping and oversight resulted in hundreds of degrees being awarded to students who didn't finish their course work. Others enrolled who couldn't speak English or hadn't achieved the "C'' average normally required for admission.

The report depicts Dickinson State as a diploma mill for foreign students, most of whom were Chinese. Of 410 foreign students who have received four-year degrees since 2003 — most of them in the past four years — 400 did not fulfill all the graduation requirements, it said.

The report raises questions about whether public universities, strapped for cash at a time of sharply declining state support for higher education, are cutting corners to attract foreign students who typically pay full out-of-state tuition. It also comes amid an unprecedented boom in the number of Chinese students studying at U.S. universities.

Dickinson State could face penalties from the U.S. State Department for violations of the federal student visa program, as well as sanctions from the Department of Education, the Department of Homeland Security and the Higher Learning Commission in Chicago, an accreditation agency, the report said.

William Goetz, chancellor of the North Dakota university system, and Dickinson State's new president, D.C. Coston, did not respond to emails and phone calls from The Associated Press. They held a news conference Friday in Dickinson to present the audit's findings.

"We will be telling (the affected students) that their records do not indicate they sufficiently completed the requirements," Coston said at the news conference. "Dickinson State stands ready to work with them individually to figure out what might be necessary for them to reach a point of completion."

Coston also held a meeting with students that was interrupted by a university lockdown after a professor was reported missing with a gun. Doug LaPlante, 59, was found dead of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound Friday afternoon near a Dickinson intersection, police said.

The audit did not mention LaPlante, but it said some affected students were business students. LaPlante was dean of Dickinson State's college of education, business and applied sciences.

The AP obtained the report through an open records request when it was distributed to members of the state Board of Higher Education before the news conference.

The audit examines the number of foreign students who took part since 2003 in a special program that allowed them to earn degrees both from Dickinson State and a university in their home country.

Only 10 of the 410 students who received degrees through the program completed all their course work and requirements, it said. About 95 percent of the students in the dual-degree program were Chinese, it said. The rest were Russian.

At least 15 foreign students were signed up for classes even though their grades were too low to qualify, the report said.

In determining foreign students' fluency in English, Dickinson State ignored two English proficiency tests that are considered good measures in favor of another that was not. Out of 27 Chinese students enrolled this spring, 21 "could not speak English at the required competency level, (and) thus were sent back home," the report said.

Many students did not have required documents such as English proficiency tests and bank statements, and some apparently fabricated course transcripts and Chinese university stamps that Dickinson State officials accepted.

"The student will change their transcript, stamp it official and submit it as an official transcript," the audit says. "The student can put any class or grade on their transcript they desire."

Founded as a teachers' training college, Dickinson State is nestled in rural southwestern North Dakota's oil-producing region, which has been undergoing an unprecedented boom as the state has vaulted into the top ranks of the nation's oil producers.

In the past five years, the school's fall enrollment has dropped from 2,670 students to almost 2,300, a consequence of what officials say are declining high school enrollments and the lure of high-paying oilfield jobs for young people.

Some of the shortfall was filled by students from China, which has been the leading exporter of college students to the United States, according to the Institute of International Education.

During the 2010-11 academic year, the latest for which figures are available, about 157,600 Chinese students were studying in the U.S., an increase of almost 24 percent from the previous year. The number of Chinese students in the United States has risen by at least 19.8 percent for each of the past four years.

Dickinson State's program typically required students to begin coursework at universities in their home countries, spend a year studying in North Dakota and then return to their home schools to finish their degrees.

The audit says Dickinson State did not get "completion transcripts" from most students' home universities but awarded them degrees anyway, meaning they received bachelor's degrees at Dickinson State for only a year's work.

Barmak Nassirian, associate executive director of the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, said some public universities are engaged in "disturbing" practices as they attempt to recruit international students. Financial pressure has prompted some to do business with shady overseas recruiters and team up with questionable institutions, Nassirian said.

"Then something like this happens and you realize that this is a slippery slope, that what might have started out as a good fit gradually gave way to a rubber stamping of people introduced to you by a partner you don't understand," he said.

The report says recruiters in China passed themselves off as Dickinson State employees, altering genuine school business cards to print their own with the title, "DSU China Center."

Students were promised they could earn their Dickinson State degree before finishing classes at their home university and the freedom to change their majors or classes as they pleased, which the audit says violated the terms of the dual-degree program.

Dickinson State had 127 agreements to work with international schools to grant degrees to their students. Only four had the detailed plans required to be recognized as valid. The report recommended canceling all the accords pending a fresh evaluation of each, and ending all agreements with outside recruiters.

Coston's predecessor, Richard McCallum, was fired by the Board of Higher Education last December for allegedly padding Dickinson State's enrollment totals in the fall of 2010 by counting students who signed up for brief seminars as full-time students.

The report on the foreign transfer program does not mention McCallum but said the number of questionable degrees granted to foreign students began to rise in the summer of 2008. McCallum was named the school's president in April 2008.

Quote:Published February 10, 2012, 04:20 PM
Doug LaPlante, a DSU dean, found dead Friday afternoon
A high-ranking and longtime Dickinson State University staff member has died of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound. The Dickinson Police Department said Friday that Doug LaPlante’s body was found in Fairway Park.
By: April Baumgarten and Dustin Monke, The Dickinson Press

[Image: copy-of-0211-doug-laplante.jpg]
Doug LaPlante

A high-ranking and longtime Dickinson State University staff member has died of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound.

The Dickinson Police Department said Friday that Doug LaPlante’s body was found in Fairway Park.

LaPlante, 59, was DSU’s dean of the college of education, business and applied sciences. He had been at the university since 1991.

“Doug was the first person at DSU I got to know when I came to North Dakota,” DSU President D.C. Coston said in a statement. “I found him to be person of deep care and unquestionable integrity. He had a deep and abiding commitment to Dickinson State and to our students.”

DPD was contacted at approximately 9:27 a.m. Friday after LaPlante had uncharacteristically missed a meeting.

Officers responded to LaPlante’s residence located in the 600 block of Ninth Avenue West, in close proximity to DSU’s campus.

An investigation revealed LaPlante had apparently left his residence on foot and had not taken his cellphone. It was also determined that a large-caliber rifle was missing from LaPlante’s residence.

A passerby saw LaPlante walking northeast toward Rocky Butte Park at about 8 a.m., according to a DPD release.

The release said that because LaPlante was believed to be distraught, precautions were taken to shelter DSU’s campus and other schools in the vicinity.

A campus evacuation was enacted briefly before being lifted after university officials confirmed the danger to students and faculty had passed.

LaPlante’s body was found by police at approximately 1:23 p.m.

Coston planned to meet with students at Beck Auditorium at 1 p.m. Friday about the audit report that said DSU had awarded hundreds of degrees to foreign students who didn’t earn them, signed up students who couldn’t speak English and enrolled a handful without qualifying grades.

However, that meeting was cut short by the incident.

Faculty, staff and non-residential students were asked to leave the campus immediately while on-campus students are asked to return to their dormitories.
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#2
Quote:...Doug LaPlante, 59, was found dead of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound Friday afternoon near a Dickinson intersection, police said.

The audit did not mention LaPlante, but it said some affected students were business students. LaPlante was dean of Dickinson State's college of education, business and applied sciences.

Now that's what I call a team player. Not only does he take personal responsibility for his (or somebody's) mistakes (or crimes), he creates a perfect fall guy for everything that has ever gone wrong or ever will go wrong at dear old Dick in son.

Where did all those paper clips go?
I saw LaPlante stuffing them in his pockets just a few days before...you know...

Why aren't there any more Ding Dongs in the vending machines?
Alls I know is that LaPlante guy was eating them like they were going out of style right before...you know...

Who spray painted "Viva La Raza" on the student union?
I theenk I saw Dean LaPlante weeth a spray can right before...you know...

Why is my tuition going up?
Well, I'm sure you can appreciate that we all have to make sacrifices because of this great tragedy with Dean LaPlante...you know...
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#3
Quote:But as an audit made public Friday revealed, lax recordkeeping and oversight resulted in hundreds of degrees being awarded to students who didn't finish their course work. Others enrolled who couldn't speak English or hadn't achieved the "C'' average normally required for admission.

The report depicts Dickinson State as a diploma mill for foreign students, most of whom were Chinese. Of 410 foreign students who have received four-year degrees since 2003 — most of them in the past four years — 400 did not fulfill all the graduation requirements, it said.

We saw that happen in Australia as well.
Come on...
How comes you do NOT get swarms of Danish, Portuguese or Belarussian students flocking to the USA or Australia, but Chinese and Indians?
And there is also the myth of the "intelligent foreigner"...some of them may be, but odds are they are hoovered up by the local top-tier universities...they can learn any language on a separate basis.
I was once stunned to discover how some people teaching Asian students abroad found that -on average- their performances were on the mediocre/poor end of the spectrum.
A.A Mole University
B.A London Institute of Applied Research
B.Sc Millard Fillmore
M.A International Institute for Advanced Studies
Ph.D London Institute of Applied Research
Ph.D Millard Fillmore
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#4
(02-13-2012, 04:21 PM)ham Wrote: Come on...
How comes you do NOT get swarms of Danish, Portuguese or Belarussian students flocking to the USA or Australia, but Chinese and Indians?
Actually all EU nations will pay for your education if you are a citizen. I do not know if its true of the UK but I know its true of German and the Nordic countries.

That would explain why few Europeans go to US Universities, except for some from the former USSR and Eastern Block nations.

My sister in law went to school in Denmark, got a Masters and was not even a citizen there. She ended up staying but got pissed when the Danish government told her that she would have to get a job because they will not support her.
"None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who falsely believe they are free."

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
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#5
Similar scam in Canada, minus the red mist. Looks like QTJ is not the biggest fraud in the Great White North after all.

@11:22
Quote:"Many students can't understand enough English to pass their courses. If they don't understand the foreign teachers teaching in a foreign language he says, they're like ducks listening to thunder."

Quote:Dubious degree
Patrick Brown, Claude Adams, 16x9 : Monday, January 23, 2012 12:47 PM


[preview; click link to story above for full video]

BC’s Douglas College is a Canadian institution with campuses in China offering courses in finance and business to hundreds of Chinese students. But recently, some serious questions have been raised about the integrity of the international joint program.

“It was outright fraud,” said Robert Buller, a former Dean of Commerce and Business Administration at the college.

Buller and two other former teachers are speaking out, saying that Canadian credentials were given to unqualified students in China. Many of the students barely understand English, even after graduating, they say.

Former teacher Richard Thwaites taught finance at Douglas College in China for five years. He says that in one case, he failed 83 of the 115 students during a finance test. But he told 16x9 that a Chinese teaching assistant reversed all but one of the failed grades.

“In Chinese post-secondary education, there’s a culture, there’s a mentality, there’s a belief that every student passes. . . . I have had Chinese faculty members tell me that they have been ordered to pass the students,” he says.

The former Douglas staff members 16x9 spoke to say the college administration knew about the problem but has done nothing for years. Buller showed 16x9 documented proof, what he called registrar’s records of doctored grades, that he says he took to the president of Douglas College, Scott McAlpine.

“The president [McAlpine] looked only at the first sheet and then terminated the meeting . . . He got up from the meeting table, walked away and said to me that he needed plausible deniability. And he wanted to see and hear nothing,” says Buller.

But when 16x9 asked McAlpine about the meeting, he said he had no memory of it.

“I have not seen that document to my recollection,” he says. “If there is academic fraud, on any scale, we need to get to the bottom of this and we need to investigate it. I do not have that information and that data at this time.”

Buller says it’s troubling to him that unqualified students are graduating and that Chinese instructors are changing the grades of struggling students.

“Unfortunately it’s not one or two students… It’s when you see a whole row of questionable entries that you say, somehow students that are absolutely not qualified are being allowed to graduate, and it should be very, very worrisome.”

Two weeks after 16x9 interviewed McAlpine, Douglas College announced that it was ordering an independent review of its teaching program in China.

Watch 16x9 Saturday at 7pm for the full investigation into what some are calling dubious Canadian degrees handed out in China.
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#6
(02-16-2012, 06:39 AM)Herbert Spencer Wrote: Similar scam in Canada, minus the red mist. Looks like QTJ is not the biggest fraud in the Great White North after all.

@11:22
Quote:"Many students can't understand enough English to pass their courses. If they don't understand the foreign teachers teaching in a foreign language he says, they're like ducks listening to thunder."

Quote:Dubious degree
Patrick Brown, Claude Adams, 16x9 : Monday, January 23, 2012 12:47 PM


[preview; click link to story above for full video]

BC’s Douglas College is a Canadian institution with campuses in China offering courses in finance and business to hundreds of Chinese students. But recently, some serious questions have been raised about the integrity of the international joint program.

“It was outright fraud,” said Robert Buller, a former Dean of Commerce and Business Administration at the college.

Buller and two other former teachers are speaking out, saying that Canadian credentials were given to unqualified students in China. Many of the students barely understand English, even after graduating, they say.

Former teacher Richard Thwaites taught finance at Douglas College in China for five years. He says that in one case, he failed 83 of the 115 students during a finance test. But he told 16x9 that a Chinese teaching assistant reversed all but one of the failed grades.

“In Chinese post-secondary education, there’s a culture, there’s a mentality, there’s a belief that every student passes. . . . I have had Chinese faculty members tell me that they have been ordered to pass the students,” he says.

The former Douglas staff members 16x9 spoke to say the college administration knew about the problem but has done nothing for years. Buller showed 16x9 documented proof, what he called registrar’s records of doctored grades, that he says he took to the president of Douglas College, Scott McAlpine.

“The president [McAlpine] looked only at the first sheet and then terminated the meeting . . . He got up from the meeting table, walked away and said to me that he needed plausible deniability. And he wanted to see and hear nothing,” says Buller.

But when 16x9 asked McAlpine about the meeting, he said he had no memory of it.

“I have not seen that document to my recollection,” he says. “If there is academic fraud, on any scale, we need to get to the bottom of this and we need to investigate it. I do not have that information and that data at this time.”

Buller says it’s troubling to him that unqualified students are graduating and that Chinese instructors are changing the grades of struggling students.

“Unfortunately it’s not one or two students… It’s when you see a whole row of questionable entries that you say, somehow students that are absolutely not qualified are being allowed to graduate, and it should be very, very worrisome.”

Two weeks after 16x9 interviewed McAlpine, Douglas College announced that it was ordering an independent review of its teaching program in China.

Watch 16x9 Saturday at 7pm for the full investigation into what some are calling dubious Canadian degrees handed out in China.

I checked Wikapedia. that paragon of unbiased truth and accuracy (ha ha), and found out that Douglas is a Public institution.

I guess that the Accreditation Mafia has a bias if favor of such schools because if this were a private, for profit school they would be slapping the "diploma mill" label all over this place.
"None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who falsely believe they are free."

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
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