Bear Guides- before 1980
#1
I have the early Bear guides, 1980-82-85. My 1982 guide lists as the 8th guide. My first one was 1980. I decided to get one or two from the 70's, but, they don't seem to exist. My 1980 guide should be number 7. That means the guides would go back to the mid to early 70's. I have looked carefully and had my son (he's better on the computer) take a good look and neither of us have been able to go back further than the 1980 guide book. Could it be that John actually started at number 7 and that there are no 1 through 6 books? If anyone has or knows about the existence of these lost books, please comment.

It would be very interesting if they don't really exist. Just saying!!
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#2
(06-26-2015, 05:49 AM)jhc7 Wrote: I have the early Bear guides, 1980-82-85. My 1982 guide lists as the 8th guide. My first one was 1980. I decided to get one or two from the 70's, but, they don't seem to exist. My 1980 guide should be number 7. That means the guides would go back to the mid to early 70's. I have looked carefully and had my son (he's better on the computer) take a good look and neither of us have been able to go back further than the 1980 guide book. Could it be that John actually started at number 7 and that there are no 1 through 6 books? If anyone has or knows about the existence of these lost books, please comment.

It would be very interesting if they don't really exist. Just saying!!

good old Klempner...baad booy! Smile
A.A Mole University
B.A London Institute of Applied Research
B.Sc Millard Fillmore
M.A International Institute for Advanced Studies
Ph.D London Institute of Applied Research
Ph.D Millard Fillmore
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#3
(11-05-2015, 01:53 PM)twodocdoug Wrote: Number 4 is on file at the LoC.

Number 6 was published by Grosset and Dunlap. Number 7 was self-published (red cover). Numbers 8 and beyond were published by Ten Speed Press.

And I thought I was stupid because I bought 1 or 2... Big Grin
A.A Mole University
B.A London Institute of Applied Research
B.Sc Millard Fillmore
M.A International Institute for Advanced Studies
Ph.D London Institute of Applied Research
Ph.D Millard Fillmore
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#4
(06-26-2015, 05:49 AM)jhc7 Wrote: I have the early Bear guides, 1980-82-85. My 1982 guide lists as the 8th guide. My first one was 1980. I decided to get one or two from the 70's, but, they don't seem to exist. My 1980 guide should be number 7. That means the guides would go back to the mid to early 70's. I have looked carefully and had my son (he's better on the computer) take a good look and neither of us have been able to go back further than the 1980 guide book. Could it be that John actually started at number 7 and that there are no 1 through 6 books? If anyone has or knows about the existence of these lost books, please comment.

It would be very interesting if they don't really exist. Just saying!!

Let me attempt to clarify. Here's more information than anyone but my mother would ever want to know.

In August 1974, I self-published an 80-page typewritten monograph devoted almost entirely to earning distance degrees from the University of London, Sales were great so in 1975, I expanded it to include thirteen US schools with non-resident programs. Red cover, and called "College Degrees by Mail."

Over the next five years, there were fourteen more printings, each one revised and expanded over the previous one. They were all called "College Degrees by Mail," and the covers were red, blue, green, and brown. .

In 1981, I decided to change the title (to "Bear's Guide to Non-Traditional College Degrees," and to introduce the concept of an edition number. But what edition number? Logically, I thought, it could be anything from 2nd to 17th, since there had been fifteen separate printings till then. I compromised on a number in the middle, 7th edition, purple cover.

Soon after that, Ten Speed Press (later to become a division of Random House) took it over. Because they fancied themselves masters of titling ("What Color is Your Parachute" has sold over 10 million copies), they retitled it, "How to Get the Degree You Want." That was the 8th edition, 1982.

It became (and stayed) Bear's Guide (or Bears' Guide or Bears Guide) thereafter, through the 16th edition. Ten Speed also created and published a separate series called "College Degrees by Mail and Modem" [or "Internet"], which went through ten editions. There were also three specialized books devoted just to MBAs, Computer Science degrees and Education degrees. And the "Non-Traditional Higher Education" book published by Dutton was a one-shot deal, unrelated to any of the above.
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#5
(11-26-2015, 11:25 AM)twodocdoug Wrote: I have an edition published by Grosset and Dunlap of the "Guide to Nontraditional Higher Education," published in 1980, that I think is the 6th edition. (It is smaller and has colored squares on the cover.)

My 7th has a red cover and came with a 4-page update. I believe I ordered that in 1981 by direct mail. The subsequent editions are all by 10 Speed.

Regardless, these books reflect the wild and wooly days of distance education--much of it from unaccredited schools with more than a few degree mills sprinkled in. It was fun to mail away for their literature and read sincere efforts (like International and Beacon Colleges) and slick materials from not-so-good schools (like Century and CULA). It was fun.

The Grosset & Dunlap book was similar to the 6th, but was a stand-alone thing re-edited for a totally different publisher. I hadn't seen it for decades, so last year I bought one for 1¢ on Bookfinder.com (plus $4 for handling).

"Wild and wooly" is a good term for those days. A lot of characters. It was fun most of the time. My wife calls it my 'academic pornography,' and was glad that I did that sort instead of the other kind.
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#6
(11-27-2015, 01:46 AM)twodocdoug Wrote:
(11-26-2015, 04:47 PM)JohnBear Wrote: "Wild and wooly" is a good term for those days. A lot of characters. It was fun most of the time. My wife calls it my 'academic pornography,' and was glad that I did that sort instead of the other kind.

That's it exactly. While I was never drawn to enroll in these schools--except for the first one I came across...Columbia Pacific--I was drawn to reading all their catalogs. (CPU's materials were really smart--in both design and content.)

Great set of books. Very informative.
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#7
Thank you.
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