THE HISTORY OF L.I.A.R.
#11
DR ANATIDAE Wrote:
Randall Flagg Wrote:I'm not sure that's possible, Neil. John prefers to shine the light of day on us, not on himself.  He seems to like the fog, lots of it. We will never really know the entire truth about these mills as the miller is the main source of information we have and he's into denial these days.  Like you, I figure much of that $50,000 went into gas, rent, bills, cigars and maybe a few pints.

Other questions worth contemplating - Did JB operate from a private dwelling when he ran L.I.A.R, Fairfax, Greenwich, etc.? Has anyone ever read JB's dissertation, or was that as fake as L.I.A.R?

I do know a lot about Greenwich and IIAS. He was living in Nashville, Tennessee, while his wife finished up her Ph.D. at Vanderbilt. Bear operated some of his home businesses from their apartment in Nashville, and he also did his work as the (Full-Time) president of IIAS from that apartment. Apparently that full-time job required very little time and effort.

Bear intended to move IIAS to Birmingham, Alabama and let Jim Campbell run it for him, but, Jim died of cancer.  Note the Alabama idea. A state that Bear has ridiculed often but it was good enough to use for IIAS. Just as Louisiana was good enough for Fairfax, and Hawaii was good enough for both Bear schools, IIAS / Greenwich. Bear would have us believe he moved to Hawaii to start Greenwich with not the slightest idea that Hawaii did not have any laws concerning unaccredited DL schools, sure. Bear likes to say that Knightsbridge is not recognized by Denmark and operates as self-evaluating, true, but, so did Greenwich. Greenwich and IIAS operated from a small building, 10,000 sq. ft., but, it only occupied 1/2 of the top floor. So two universities operated from about 2500 sq. ft., or 1250 sq. ft. each. I'm told that Greenwich did have a nice big sign out front, and John assures us that makes a big difference.   Rolleyes

You might be interested in this bit of information, Neil. We knew Bear had agreed to be on Douglas's committee at Union, twice, and at MIGS, but he also was to have been on Douglas's committee at Capella, but that didn't work out either. That has got to be the most aired out dissertation in recent times.
James
A.S., B.S., M.B.A.
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#12
By the way if you want to see one of Bear's Graduates:

http://web.archive.org/web/2002101012040...VOW.htm  

Go down to Greenwich University and look at the left side of the diploma, and, there's good old John Bear's signature.

Rick Walston-Author of Walston's Guide to Christian Distance Education.

I hope this degree from this self-evaluated school, located in  Hawaii, a state that did not have any rules or standards for unaccredited schools, has met the needs of this well known author. I do hope with all my heart that Bear does not think this degree "too light" or worse "Problematic."  Surely it can't be "merely dreadful" and don't tell me it might even be "Phoney."  

Of course I was just making fun of that ridiculous John Bear and his crap. Rick Walston has a real degree from Greenwich just as many others have real degrees from other unaccredited /self-evaluated schools. I just wanted to show how sharp and silly the whines of Bear are. The schools are real or not by what they do and require, not by being accredited or unaccredited. Greenwich was real, Knightsbridge is real.
James
A.S., B.S., M.B.A.
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#13
the weblink is badly formatted
here is the "diploma" awarded by "president" dr. John Bear...


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   
A.A Mole University
B.A London Institute of Applied Research
B.Sc Millard Fillmore
M.A International Institute for Advanced Studies
Ph.D London Institute of Applied Research
Ph.D Millard Fillmore
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#14
ham Wrote:the weblink is badly formatted
here is the "diploma" awarded by "president" dr. John Bear...

"Some people argue, in effect that if a school is NOT ACCREDITED, that it is a degree mill. This is NONSENSE. Look at the Credentials of Dr. Walston and his colleagues. And look at the work of the students."
--John Bear--Recommendation for Columbia Seminary--CES Website

http://www.columbiaseminary.edu/recommen...dents.html

Check out these Recommendations:

http://www.columbiaseminary.edu/wg5hed.html

Now one wonders what happened to "Too Light" "Problematic" "Merely Dreadful" "Phoney."

I guess it just depends on who is doing it, not what is done. John Bear praises the Credentials of Rick Walston, not mentioning his unaccredited degree, as he would with almost every other school owner.

Rick Walston seems to be a decent guy and is well educated, including the Greenwich degree. It would be nice if Bear could treat other unaccredited degree holders with the same level of respect as he does Dr. Walston.
James
A.S., B.S., M.B.A.
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#15
Now look at these Student Testimonials and tell Me that these are from Ignorant-Uneducated-Buffoons who don't Know What They are Talking about.

http://www.columbiaseminary.edu/recommen...index.html

It is obvious that these students are well pleased and satisfied with their degrees from the Unaccredited Columbia Evangelical Seminary. It also shows exactly what the graduates of many other unaccredited schools have said. They have just as much right to satisfaction with their schools as do the graduates of CES. Bear Approval, ain't accreditation, ain't State Approval, ain't State Licensing, it is just the ramblings of a business man who moves with the flow of cash. Good Today, bad Tomorrow, or maybe not. All as the mood strikes him.

Choose your schools based on what you believe and can find out from open-minded, common sense people. If unaccredited schools suit your needs and wants, good, if not, look to the accredited schools, it's your choice. Not the choice of the people who are trying to sell you something. They will tell you what is best for them, Not For You.
James
A.S., B.S., M.B.A.
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#16
Quote:"Some people argue, in effect that if a school is NOT ACCREDITED, that it is a degree mill. This is NONSENSE. Look at the Credentials of Dr. Walston and his colleagues. And look at the work of the students."
--John Bear--Recommendation for Columbia Seminary--CES Website

http://www.columbiaseminary.edu/recommen...dents.html

See page attached


Attached Files
.pdf   Columbia Evangelical Seminary JOHN BEAR ENDORSEMENT FRAUD.pdf (Size: 69.48 KB / Downloads: 4)
A.A Mole University
B.A London Institute of Applied Research
B.Sc Millard Fillmore
M.A International Institute for Advanced Studies
Ph.D London Institute of Applied Research
Ph.D Millard Fillmore
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#17
Bear has even allowed some unaccredited school operators write their own school descriptions for the guides. Now is that what we were paying for? If Bear wanted to make friends with certain school operators that's too bad. He was supposed to write the school characterizations himself.  One can only wonder how often this went on and how deeply it changed the output. We expected unbiased investigations of each school so that we might fairly evaluate each option and now we discover that some school operators wrote their own reports. Somehow I doubt they found anything negative to report.
James
A.S., B.S., M.B.A.
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#18
From a recent Google Search:

GORDON GREB
Prof. Gordon Greb holds an honorary degree from the London Institute of Applied Research for humorous writing, but he says he doesn't like to be called "Doc" for fear he'll be called upon to deliver a baby in an emergency situation some day.
He was a reporter and editor for newspapers, then became a radio and television newsman, working for ABC, CBS and NBC, before joining the faculty at San Jose State University. His peers named him a "distinguished broadcast educator" during his 35 years there. (He's now an SJSU emeritus professor.) He's the co-author of "Charles Herrold: Inventor of Radio Broadcasting" (McFarland, 2003) and a noted civil libertarian whose research helped the U.S. Supreme Court overturn movie censorship in 1952 with the crucial case, Burstyn v. Wilson, et al. He now calls himself "a recovering academic" that former student Gerald Nachman said, in a recent Newsweek article, is "much funnier and hip" today, in his 80s, than he was in college. His colleagues at TheColumnists
include former students Gerald Nachman, Ron Miller, Michael Johnson, Joyce Kiefer, Elias Castillo and Joanne Engelhardt.
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#19
More history from The New York Press:

NEWS & COLUMNS
By William Bryk

Bear’s Guide

"Back where I come from," the Wizard of Oz said, "we have universities–seats of great learning–where men go to become great thinkers. And when they come out they think deep thoughts with no more brains than you have. But they have one thing you haven’t got–a diploma. Therefore, by virtue of the authority vested in me by Universitatis Commitatibus E Pluribus Unum, I hereby confer on you the honorary degree of Th.D, Doctor of Thinkology."

I first heard of John Bear in 1990, when a man from Michigan named Bob Adams told me about the Ethiopian ear-pickers. In 1966, Southern Methodist University gave Bob Hope an honorary doctorate after the entertainer gave it a substantial donation. Up at Michigan State University, John Bear was earning his doctorate the hard way. Bear resented this. He knew that President Fillmore refused all honorary doctorates, even from Oxford. Bear then founded the Millard Fillmore Institute to honor the 13th president’s memory. The Institute awarded doctorates with ornately engraved diplomas on genuine imitation parchment that read, "By virtue of powers which we have invented…" granting "the honorary and meretricious" doctorate "magna cum grano salis"–with a big grain of salt.

Six years later, while studying in London, he tried the same thing on a larger scale. He and some friends created the London Institute for Applied Research and ran advertisements in American publications: "Phony honorary doctorates for sale, $25." Several hundred were sold, presumably keeping the promoters in whiskey and cigars. As Bear wrote, half the world’s academic establishment thought L.I.A.R. was a great gag. The other half felt it threatened life as we knew it. After wearing out the joke, Bear traded the remaining diplomas to a Dutchman for 100 pounds of metal crosses and Ethiopian ear-pickers. (The Dutchman is still selling them–for $100 a piece.)

With this kind of experience, Bear first published Bear’s Guide, his profoundly serious and wildly funny guide to alternative higher education, more than a quarter-century ago. The latest edition, the 14th, crossed my desk last week. This is probably the best available practical guide to obtaining legitimate college degrees without full-time attendance in a conventional college setting, whether through correspondence, independent study, college credit through examination or life-experience learning or the Internet. As Bear notes, in 1970, if one wanted to earn a degree without sitting in a classroom for three or four years and wanted to remain in North America, one had two choices: the Universities of London and of South Africa. Today, one has more than 1000 options.

To be sure, I loved my completely traditional undergraduate experience, down to the last mug of beer. But that was a quarter-century ago, when one could pay a year’s tuition with the money one earned over the summer as a dishwasher. That isn’t the case anymore.

Also, American college education is more about obtaining a credential than inheriting the intellectual legacy of the West. I regret this; so, I sense, does Bear. This is part of a phenomenon that might be called "credentialism." One might define it as a false objectivity in personnel decisions by substituting credentials, particularly academic diplomas, for the analysis of character, intelligence and ability or even the intelligent exercise of judgment in hiring, firing and promoting.

Bear argues that an academic degree is more useful to one’s career than practical knowledge. Whether this is good for society is immaterial. He illustrates this point with an anecdote about a telephone call from the man in charge of sawing off tree limbs for a Midwestern city. The city government had decreed that all agency heads must have baccalaureates. The head sawyer didn’t have one. If he didn’t earn a degree within two years, he would lose the job he had competently performed for two decades. The reality of his competence was immaterial to someone else’s need for false objectivity.

Nor are we in New York immune from this. For example, the city government now requires applicants for the police examinations to have 60 college credits. Surely no one who has attended college will seriously claim that accumulating credits raises barriers to brutality or provides a sure test of intelligence, industry, courage and character.

To Bear, traditional education awards degrees for time served and credit earned, pursuant to a medieval formula combining generalized and specialized education, in a classroom on a campus. The kind of nontraditional education emphasized by his book awards degrees on the basis of competencies and performance skills, using methodologies that cultivate self-direction and independence through planned independent study, generally off campus.

More practically, nontraditional routes are now radically less expensive. One can obtain a bachelor’s degree from New York’s Excelsior College (formerly Regents College) or New Jersey’s Thomas Edison State College without stepping into a classroom. For example, Excelsior awards degrees to persons who have accumulated sufficient credits through various means, including noncollege learning experience such as corporate training programs, military training and professional licenses; equivalency examintions such as the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), the Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support (DANTES), the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE); its own nationally recognized examination program; and even educational portfolios evaluated through its partnerships with other institutions, such as Ohio University.

However, in a world that cheapens the humanities to a mere credential and refuses to evaluate intelligence, experience and common sense, it’s a short step to advancing one’s career through exaggeration and even downright deceit. Remember that a diploma is merely a document evidencing the holder’s completion of a particular course of study.

Even the once-sacred transcript, the official record of the work one has done to earn a degree, is no longer so. Some made creative use of color copiers and laser printers. Others hacked into college computer systems for fun and learned how to alter records for profit.

Finagling, though, has always been part of the American doctoral tradition. Bear claims the first American doctorate came about thus.

Traditionally, only a person with a doctorate can bestow a doctorate upon someone else. At the end of the 17th century, Harvard’s faculty had no instructors with doctorates. Its president, Increase Mather, belonged to a religious sect anathema to the Church of England and hence legally ineligible for a doctorate from any English university. Harvard’s faculty, which then consisted of two people, solved this problem by unanimous agreement to award Mather an honorary doctorate. Mather, in turn, conferred doctorates upon his instructors.

They, in turn, began doctoring their students.

Yale apparently awarded America’s first professional doctorate. Daniel Turner, a British physician, gave Yale some 50 medical textbooks. Yale awarded him an MD in absentia (Turner never set foot in America). According to Bear, some suggested that the MD must stand for multum donavit: "he gave a lot."

Bear also discusses as one might expect the anomaly of the honorary degree. In a country where the government is forbidden from granting titles of nobility, higher education fills the gap with honorary doctorates, which are simply titles bestowed for various reasons upon various individuals. Bear suggests an analogy to an army granting the honorary rank of general to a civilian who may then use it in everyday life.

Of course there are doctorates and there are doctorates. My alma mater, for example, grants honorary doctorates to a few distinguished men and women every year. Among them, invariably, is the chief executive of some corporation whose foundation has made a substantial contribution to the college’s endowment. The Rev. Kirby Hensley’s renowned Universal Life Church, which awards an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree to anyone who ponies up $30 (it used to be only $5), merely takes this to its logical extreme.

My favorite chapters discuss phony degrees and diploma mills, some of which operate wildly beyond the law: In 1978, one diploma mill proprietor was arrested as Mike Wallace was interviewing him for 60 Minutes. Usually unaccredited, usually operating in one of the handful of states that barely regulate private higher education (currently Hawaii seems the happy hunting ground of the degree mill), such institutions flourish because people want to avoid the work of getting a real degree. After 60 Minutes aired its program, the network received thousands of telephone calls and letters from people who wanted the addresses and telephone numbers of the diploma mills exposed by the program.

And who can blame them? In some states, a doctorate from a one-room Bible school is sufficient to set up practice as a marriage counselor and psychotherapist. At least one major figure in the New York City Parking Violations Bureau scandals had been a marriage counselor on the strength of his advanced degrees from the College of St. Thomas in Montreal, Canada. This was a theological seminary sponsored by an Old Catholic church whose archbishop, a retired plumber (I met him once: his weakness for lace on his episcopal finery left me cold), operated the college from His Excellency’s apartment. Quebec simply did not regulate religious seminaries; this allowed the archbishop to claim, accurately, that the degrees were lawful and valid. They were also worthless.

As Bear notes, in Hawaii and Louisiana, the one-man church founded yesterday may sponsor a university today that may grant a doctorate in nuclear physics tomorrow. One Louisiana diploma mill successfully argued that as God created everything, all subjects were the study of God and therefore a religious degree. This may be theologically sound, but if I learned my physician held his MD from this school, I would seek another doctor.

As long as people value others more for their pieces of paper than for the content of their character, the diploma mill will flourish. But the intelligent careerist will use common sense and the guides of John Bear.

Bears’ Guide to Earning Degrees by Distance Learning, Ten Speed Press, PO Box 7123, Berkeley, CA 94707, $29.95, www.tenspeed.com.

  
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#20
So John Bear found it disgusting that colleges were granting honorary Ph.D's. In fact so disgusted did he become that he decided to do it himself to teach them a lesson. He cranked up Millard Fillmore and L.I.A.R.  Hmmm, isn't that like a man saying he is opposed to killing and to prove it kills two people?

I think that he really wanted some of the action, saw a good chance, and jumped in with both feet. People always have good reasons for very shady actions that bring them extra cash, Millard Fillmore and L.I.A.R. were just two more.

John Bear found a good cash cow, degree mills and unaccredited schools, back in 1970-72, and he rode that old cow right up to his love affair with Heriot-Watt, then, finding a more productive cash producer, he rode off into the sunset into that nice, very comfortable, retirement.  Follow the cash and you know where he came from, where he went, and most important, why. Rolleyes

"A bank book is the greedy man's bible."
--American
James
A.S., B.S., M.B.A.
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