Clayton Crumbles, Bear Boasts
#1
Bear accepts responsibility for starting yet another failed/unscrupulous enterprise:
Quote:I agree with Chip. Wonderful news. In a backhanded way, I bear some responsibility for this operation. During the two years I lived in Tennessee (1986-88], I used to get regular phone calls from Lloyd Clayton, asking for advice on how to start a school. It became clear to me that his interest was far more in the direction of profitability than academics, and our discussions ended. And then there were all those full-page color ads in health and nutrition and new age publications touting Clayton as one of the pioneers of distance and online education. For many years, Clayton's schools had a private deal with Alabama authorities: they would leave him alone as long as he did not accept any students living in Alabama. [Very much like what Kennedy-Western had in California. Wonder if there are other examples?]
http://forums.degreeinfo.com/distance-le...-down.html

As usual, he confesses and immediately denies.
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#2
Ryan Steele Wrote:Bear accepts responsibility for starting yet another failed/unscrupulous enterprise:
Quote:I agree with Chip. Wonderful news. In a backhanded way, I bear some responsibility for this operation. During the two years I lived in Tennessee (1986-88], I used to get regular phone calls from Lloyd Clayton, asking for advice on how to start a school. It became clear to me that his interest was far more in the direction of profitability than academics, and our discussions ended. And then there were all those full-page color ads in health and nutrition and new age publications touting Clayton as one of the pioneers of distance and online education. For many years, Clayton's schools had a private deal with Alabama authorities: they would leave him alone as long as he did not accept any students living in Alabama. [Very much like what Kennedy-Western had in California. Wonder if there are other examples?]
http://forums.degreeinfo.com/distance-le...-down.html

As usual, he confesses and immediately denies.
The pot calls the kettle black, eh?
"None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who falsely believe they are free."

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
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#3
CCNH was a legitimate school.

It focused on holistic nutrition. The sole and only arguments for why people were calling it a "diploma mill" are along the same arguments for why Patriot Bible University was called a "diploma mill". Namely: "I don't believe in it".

I'm sorry, but "I don't believe in that subject" has nothing to do with "diploma mills".

Should a bible school teach anything else besides biblical beliefs?

Should a school on holistic nutrition teach anything besides holistic nutrition?

Really, these people are morons. If you look at the curriculum of each school one can clearly see that students are expected to take courses in their subject matter.

In regards to Natural Homeopathy, it's not truly a "medical field" at as these idiots state, either. It's herbal-remedy, natural well-being sort of thing which you might find at an indian reserve and which a hipster might enjoy.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FmAoVRQDTFA
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#4
RespectableGent Wrote:In regards to Natural Homeopathy, it's not truly a "medical field" at as these idiots state, either. It's herbal-remedy, natural well-being sort of thing which you might find at an indian reserve and which a hipster might enjoy.
Native Americans have the lowest life expectancy of any ethnic group in the United States. Just sayin'
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#5
From the Private School Licensing Division of the Alabama Department of Postsecondary Education:
Quote:STATEMENT REGARDING CLAYTON COLLEGE OF NATURAL HEALTH

Members of the Private School Licensing Staff met with officials from Clayton College on Monday, July 12, 2010. School officials represented that a teach out plan will made available to some students and that details will be available by the end of this week. School officials committed to keeping the PSL division informed of the teach out plan and any arrangements for transfer credits to other schools of natural health.

CCNH officials, and their attorney, were advised that Alabama law requires that closed school transcripts be forwarded to the Alabama Department of Postsecondary Education, Private School Licensing Division. A bond is required before a license is issued. However, based upon the number of students involved, the bond will offer very limited financial reimbursement. Before any refund procedures from the bond can begin, the administrative remedies available through Clayton College of Natural Health should be exhausted. A statement posted on the CCNH website list the following as the appropriate address by which to contact the school:

Clayton College of Natural Health
P.O. Box 2488
Birmingham, AL 35201

Quote:Birmingham's Clayton College of Natural Health offers closing plan

Tuesday, July 13, 2010, 9:00 AM
Stan Diel -- The Birmingham News

Administrators with Clayton College of Natural Health, an unaccredited Internet correspondence school based on Birmingham's Southside, met with state regulators Monday to propose a plan for closing the school, regulators said.

Clayton officials proposed, in broad strokes, a "teach-out" plan that would keep some staff at work temporarily and enable an undetermined number of students to complete their degrees. Clayton officials are expected to propose a more detailed plan by the end of the week, said Annette McGrady, a specialist in the private school licensure division of the Alabama Department of Postsecondary Education.

The private, for-profit college, which offers undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees in holistic health and nutrition, last week dismissed 30 of its 50 employees and began planning to close, school President Jeff Goin said. The school has more than 3,000 active students scattered across the United States, he said.

Goin said Friday that the recession had hit the school hard and was responsible for the closure. The decision to cease operations is not related to a new state law requiring schools that award degrees to be accredited by an agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education, he said. Clayton College has no such accreditation, but has an accreditation application pending with the Distance Education and Training Council. An active application meets the requirements of the state law, passed in 2008.

The school was founded by Lloyd Clayton, who also founded Chadwick University, another private Southside-based school. That school, which offered degrees in business, criminal justice and social and behavioral sciences and also was unaccredited, closed two years ago after state regulators revoked its license.
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#6
Ryan Steele Wrote:Native Americans have the lowest life expectancy of any ethnic group in the United States. Just sayin'

Not true.  See, e.g., http://health.dailynewscentral.com/conte...002418/42/

"Just sayin'" is apparently the equivalent of "here's something I picked out of my ass."  

"Native Americans suffer from higher rates of diabetes, tuberculosis, pneumonia, influenza, and alcoholism than does the rest of the U.S. population," according to a 1998 study.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9532441
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#7
Quote:Students in limbo after Birmingham Web-based college closes

Published: Thursday, July 15, 2010, 8:48 AM     Updated: Thursday, July 15, 2010, 10:19 AM
Michelle D. Anderson -- The Birmingham News

Several students enrolled at a now-defunct, unaccredited, Internet-based school in Birmingham are seeking reimbursements and looking for ways to still obtain their degrees after the school shut down unexpectedly last week.

Students from as far away as Idaho and as close as Birmingham were taking courses through Clayton College of Natural Health, a correspondence school that offered undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees in holistic health. Since the school announced on Facebook last week that financial hardship is forcing it to close, students say they have been unable to reach school officials.

Share Ileana Sisson, a licensed psychotherapist based in Florida said she spent about $5,000 on two doctoral programs from Clayton College.

Sisson said she doesn't know what she's going to do next.

"I don't have a plan. I just want my Ph.D.," Sisson said. "It's impossible to say overnight that students have a plan B."

More than 3,000 students were enrolled at the college, which recently dismissed 30 of its 50 employees. School officials met with state regulators Monday to discuss a "teach-out plan" that would allow an undetermined number of students to complete their degree program.

The college's president, Jeff Goin, said earlier this week that financial strain led to the closing of the school, not a state law that passed in 2008 which required institutions to have accreditation through an agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education.

The school had a pending accreditation with the Distance Education and Training Council and was licensed by the Alabama Department of Postsecondary Education.

Attempts to interview college officials at the college's headquarters on Wednesday were unsuccessful.

Annette McGrady, a specialist at an Alabama Department of Postsecondary Education division said Tuesday that the school is expected to provide a more detailed plan later this week.

Sisson said she will take advantage of the teach-out plan if it was offered to her. "The value of the degree would be minimal, but at least I would have earned a Ph.D.," Sisson said.

David Burge, a news reporter in El Paso, Texas, who was in the herbalist program, said he does not know whether he will pursue his degree elsewhere. "It's pretty deflating and kind of depressing," said Burge. "I had no complaints about the school before."

Burge said he spent nearly $2,000 on tuition and books. At the time of the school's closing, he was completing the ninth class of the 10-class program.

When he started the program, Burge said he knew that it lacked accreditation, but pursued a degree there because he had no intent on practicing medicine.

Students have been communicating this week through social media.

Facebook page starts

Carey Gage joined with other students to start a Facebook group and said she wants to get compensation and is considering legal action against the college.

Gage paid about $4,000 for a bachelor's degree program in advance, but said she has contacted her credit-card company to dispute the transaction she made to pay for tuition as an attempt to get reimbursement.

The Houston-area based massage therapist said she had just started the second class toward her bachelor's degree in natural health.

Lori Tindall of Boise, Idaho, said she has paid about $7,000 for her master's degree in science and holistic nutrition and was within three courses of completing the program. The yoga instructor said she will take advantage of the teach-out program if one is offered.

Tindall said she has tried to reach school officials to no avail, but would give them time to respond before filing a formal complaint.

"I honestly thought Clayton College was a more professional school," Tindall said. "I guess this is the other side of going to an unaccredited college. There are no checks and balances to keep them in order."
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#8
Link to Facebook discussion referred to in the article above:
http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=137181372972495

Link to FTC complaint form: https://www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov/FT...px?Lang=en

Link to Alabama Attorney General complaint form:
http://www.ago.state.al.us/consumer_form.cfm

Last known street address for CCNH appears to be: 2140 11th Avenue South, Suite 305, Birmingham, AL 35205
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#9
Ryan Steele Wrote:Bear accepts responsibility for starting yet another failed/unscrupulous enterprise

Definitely failed.  Whether they are unscrupulous or not remains to be seen.  Looks like a lot of people potentially have gotten stung.  Let's hope refunds or teachouts at no extra cost are on the horizon.

BTW, just how worthless is the Better Business Bureau?  Right up until CCNH went out of business the BBB was touting them as "A+" rated.  

"Information in this BBB Reliability Report is believed reliable, but not guaranteed as to accuracy."  The secret seems to be that instead of screwing one or two students at a time and having them complain, you screw everybody all at once, take the money and run.  They ought to change their disclaimer to "Information in this report is less than useless.  Don't waste your time."  

See cached version from Google: http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/se...am-al-9377

Quote:BBB Reliability Report for

Clayton College Of Natural Health, Inc.

A BBB Accredited business since 11/01/1989.

BBB Rating A+

BBB issues Reliability Reports on all businesses, whether or not they are BBB accredited. If a business is a BBB Accredited Business, it is stated in this report.


BBB Accreditation
This company has been a BBB Accredited business since November 1989. This means it supports BBB's services to the public and meets our BBB Accreditation standards.


BBB Rating
Based on BBB files, this business has a BBB Rating of A+ on a scale from A+ to F.
Click here for an explanation of BBB Ratings


Business Contact and Profile
Name: Clayton College Of Natural Health, Inc.
Phone: (205) 323-8236
Fax: (205) 308-2521
Address: 2140 11th Ave S Ste 323
Birmingham, AL 35205
Website: www.ccnh.edu
Original Business Start Date: January 1980
Principal: Ms. Kay Channell, CEO
Customer Contact: Ms. Kay Channell, CEO - (205) 323-8236
Entity: Corporation
Incorporated: January 1980, AL
Type of Business: Schools-Business & Vocational
BBB Accreditation: This organization is a BBB Accredited business.
Additional DBA Names: American Holistic College of Nutrition

Products and Services
Based on information provided, this company offers degree and certificate programs in natural health, holistic nutrition and traditional naturopathy via distance education.

Business Management
Additional company management personnel include:
Ms. Susie Hale - Vice President
Mr. John Muir - IT Coordinator
Ms. Kelli Burt - Director of Accounting


Additional Locations and Phone Numbers
Additional Addresses
2101 Magnolia Ave S Ste 400
Birmingham, AL  35205-2852


Additional Phone Numbers
Tel: (205) 323-8242
Tel: (800) 769-2427
Tel: (205) 214-1120


Customer Complaint History
When considering complaint information, please take into account the company's size and volume of transactions, and understand that the nature of complaints and a firm's responses to them are often more important than the number of complaints.
BBB processed a total of 3 complaints about this company in the last 36 months, our standard reporting period. Of the total of 3 complaints closed in 36 months, 0 were closed in the last year.

Sales Practice Issues  
   Resolved  
      1 -  Company resolved the complaint issues. The consumer acknowledged acceptance to BBB.
  
Refund or Exchange Issues  
   Resolved  
      1 -  Company resolved the complaint issues. The consumer acknowledged acceptance to BBB.
      1 -  Company addressed the complaint issues. The consumer failed to acknowledge acceptance to BBB.


BBB Program Participation
This company has agreed to use special procedures including arbitration, if necessary, to resolve disputes through their participation in the following programs: BBB Identification, BBBOnLine.  

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As a matter of policy, BBB does not endorse any product, service or business.

BBB Reliability Reports are provided solely to assist you in exercising your own best judgment. Information in this BBB Reliability Report is believed reliable, but not guaranteed as to accuracy.

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If you choose to do business with this business, please let the business know that you contacted BBB for a BBB Reliability Report.
ID: 9377
Report as of June 16, 2010 18:19
Copyright© 2010 Better Business Bureau
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#10
Clayton didn't take their money and run. The article says that they met with state officials this Monday to see about setting up a teach-out plan with another school.
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