I'd Really Like to Know
#1
I know what is written in these "guides" and their lack of any apparant value, but what I'd REALLY like to know if if ANY school GUARANTEES that their degrees can be used for ANYTHING the student desires.

Do ANY schools (such as U of Phoenix, WGU, etc) actually say their degrees will be accepted anywhere, for any use, OR do they have DISCLAIMERS saying there may be limitations.

If there are disclaimers, has anyone seen one?
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#2
no catch-all disclaimers, EG " for what is worth. Talk with your prospective employer", but qualifications, EG "our law degree is/is not ABC accredited- does/does not grant access to state/guild/bar exams".
Most conscientious universities make clear which degrees meet eventual state-guild-licensure degrees (=fitness for a particular purpose ).
Bottom line, as the degree mills' most favorite UK Parliament quote says, the fitness of a degree for a job is ultimately left to the prospective employer's judgement (barred of course professions/jobs needing further licensure/exams etc ): you can't obligate a prospective employer, irrespective of your degree.
A.A Mole University
B.A London Institute of Applied Research
B.Sc Millard Fillmore
M.A International Institute for Advanced Studies
Ph.D London Institute of Applied Research
Ph.D Millard Fillmore
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#3
ham Wrote:no catch-all disclaimers, EG " for what is worth. Talk with your prospective employer", but qualifications, EG "our law degree is/is not ABC accredited- does/does not grant access to state/guild/bar exams".
Most conscientious universities make clear which degrees meet eventual state-guild-licensure degrees (=fitness for a particular purpose ).
Bottom line, as the degree mills' most favorite UK Parliament quote says, the fitness of a degree for a job is ultimately left to the prospective employer's judgement (barred of course professions/jobs needing further licensure/exams etc ): you can't obligate a prospective employer, irrespective of your degree.


But, do any legitimate school's websites say something like this? I'd think that in this litigious society, schools would include some kind of disclaimer to avoid lawsuits against students who received a degree, but then were not hired for one reason or another... Are there such disclaimers, or are these just at "mills?"
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#4
Kids /and even adults now, are always bitching about why their ten year old car breaks down and why their degree from (some unknown school) doesn't permit them to be the next CEO of General Motors.

They confuse the quality of the school with their own (very often) substandard assets. I saw one guy actually take a sandwich to a job interview. In life you are selling yourself, all of you, not just the degree. The school can only carry you so far. The rest is up to you.
James
A.S., B.S., M.B.A.
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#5
Randall Flagg Wrote:Kids /and even adults now, are always bitching about why their ten year old car breaks down and why their degree from (some unknown school) doesn't permit them to be the next CEO of General Motors.

They confuse the quality of the school with their own (very often) substandard assets. I saw one guy actually take a sandwich to a job interview. In life you are selling yourself, all of you, not just the degree. The school can only carry you so far. The rest is up to you.

Of course, that's true. But, are schools putting out any disclaimers to avoid potential (albeit frivolous) lawsuits?
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#6
Quote:But, do any legitimate school's websites say something like this? I'd think that in this litigious society, schools would include some kind of disclaimer to avoid lawsuits against students who received a degree, but then were not hired for one reason or another... Are there such disclaimers, or are these just at "mills?"

exactly, what do degree mills disclaim? NOT that they are not able to secure you a job of YOUR choice, BUT ACCREDITATION.
You may be denied either chances to get a job, or the job itself because your credentials are bunk, and they want no part in it.

What you mean is addressed unofficially with market research, employment fairs, employment research...EG annual reviews of UK universities (TIMES, THE GUARDIAN ) publish even ranking about employment, EG Oxford University's philosophy had a 10/10 employment ratio, etc...how reliable their findings are is one's guess.
Most universities love to showcase a few celebrity graduates who got important jobs, but what about the other 90-95% graduates?
Second, for all you know they got the job via another degree they hold; family connections; backstage dealing or other way unrelated to schooling.
Often universities qualify their unofficial statements: all our XYZ science graduates receive an average of N job offers

Our postgraduates rank higher with average salaries of XYZ

Then you usually have asterisks with disclaimers...the top ten percent of 1990-95 classes; the fifty-eight (out of five hundreds twelve ) surveyed, whatever.

Sure, Cambridge might be a better introduction in itself than Lampeter, but think about how much you paid for it.
A.A Mole University
B.A London Institute of Applied Research
B.Sc Millard Fillmore
M.A International Institute for Advanced Studies
Ph.D London Institute of Applied Research
Ph.D Millard Fillmore
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#7
I've seen many accredited schools say "Check with the school you are considering to see if our credits will transfer." Schools like Harvard are very picky. They reject most applicants and where your degrees come from and how it is rated does make a difference.

In one particular case a student with an Excelsior degree was rejected by Hunter College. But, it is possible that another person with the same degree might have been accepted. Each situation is different. Though the gang will tell you that if it's RA that's all that matters, nonsense, everything matters. One person makes something fly another fails. You never know for sure till you try.
James
A.S., B.S., M.B.A.
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